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Aerial photos show work on new flyover at M2 Stockbury Roundabout junction 5 with A249 near Sittingbourne

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The sheer scale of the work on a new flyover at one of the county’s busiest roundabouts can be shown for the first time.

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Aerial pictures by KentOnline photographer Barry Goodwin clearly show the changes at Stockbury near Sittingbourne.

The M2 crossing the A249 at junction 5 at Stockbury. Vegetation has been removed to make way for a £92m flyover. Picture: Barry Goodwin
The M2 crossing the A249 at junction 5 at Stockbury. Vegetation has been removed to make way for a £92m flyover. Picture: Barry Goodwin
Aerial view of work on Stockbury roundabout at Sittingbourne. Maidstone is to the left. Picture: Barry Goodwin
Aerial view of work on Stockbury roundabout at Sittingbourne. Maidstone is to the left. Picture: Barry Goodwin
Vegetation has been removed from around Stockbury roundabout as part of a £92m scheme to build a flyover linking the A249 with the M2 at junction 5 near Sittingbourne. Picture: Barry Goodwin
Vegetation has been removed from around Stockbury roundabout as part of a £92m scheme to build a flyover linking the A249 with the M2 at junction 5 near Sittingbourne. Picture: Barry Goodwin
Stockbury roundabout from the air Picture: Barry Goodwin
Stockbury roundabout from the air Picture: Barry Goodwin
The M2 crossing the A249 at Stockbury, Sittingbourne Picture: Barry Goodwin
The M2 crossing the A249 at Stockbury, Sittingbourne Picture: Barry Goodwin
Vegetation has been stripped away from the side of the A249 to make way for a £92m flyover at junction 5 of the M2 at Stockbury roundabout. Picture: Barry Goodwin
Vegetation has been stripped away from the side of the A249 to make way for a £92m flyover at junction 5 of the M2 at Stockbury roundabout. Picture: Barry Goodwin

National Highways is driving through work on a new £92m flyover linking the A249 with the M2 at junction 5.

After years of frustration for motorists trapped in jams caused by annoying prangs, diffident traffic lights or just too many vehicles, there is now light at the end of the tunnel.

A series of weekend closures of the A249, which links the Isle of Sheppey to Maidstone, have allowed gas, water and electricity supplies to be moved.

Despite delays caused by bad weather, notably Storm Eunice, engineers have managed to complete preparation work at Oad Street without even shutting the road.

But the real fun has just begun as contractors start changing the layout of the Sheppey-bound A249 where it meets the roundabout on the Maidstone side.

A National Highways spokesman warned: “To do this safely we’ll have lane closures from 8pm to and 6am Monday to Friday in both directions between the roundabout and Chalky Hill for four weeks.”

Artist's impression of how the new A249 flyover at Stockbury will look Picture: National Highways
Artist’s impression of how the new A249 flyover at Stockbury will look Picture: National Highways
Tailbacks on the A249 at Stockbury are a daily hazard
Tailbacks on the A249 at Stockbury are a daily hazard
Diggers stripping earth next to Stockbury roundabout at Sittingbourne. Picture: John Nurden
Diggers stripping earth next to Stockbury roundabout at Sittingbourne. Picture: John Nurden

But he added: “There will always be one lane open to traffic in both directions.”

The dedicated entry slip to the London-bound M2 will then be closed for the first foundations of the flyover to be dug. Drivers will still be able to join the M2 from the roundabout.

For the time being, the most motorists can see at car level are vast tracks of earth and stark open spaces of chalk where trees and bushes once grew.

Diggers moved onto the site in October last year. The new interchange will include two dedicated slip roads onto the M2 without traffic lights and the re-routing of the old Maidstone Road with new links to Oad Street.

Work is due to end in 2025. Updates are available here.

The photos are published as its warned Kent could face another three weeks of traffic chaos.

Brenley Corner roundabout on the junction with the M2 and the A2, coastbound Picture: Barry Goodwin
Brenley Corner roundabout on the junction with the M2 and the A2, coastbound Picture: Barry Goodwin

The notorious Brenley Corner roundabout – where the A2, M2 and A299 converge – will remain reduced to one lane for the rest of April as part of a plan to reduce hold-ups at Dover.

Officers are using the junction as a stopping point to prevent HGV drivers from travelling along the A2 to reach the port and Channel Tunnel.

Rogue hauliers trying to avoid Operation Brock on the M20 are being diverted to go back and join Junction 8 of the M20 at Maidstone.

While helping to reduce congestion approaching Dover, the traffic management scheme has caused severe congestion on the roads around Brenley Corner.

Motorists have been met with hold-ups of up to two hours as they attempt to go about their usual journeys.

The “nightmare” situation at the roundabout is set to be in force until April 30, and highways bosses are warning of yet more congestion over a busy Easter period.

On Tuesday, it was revealed police have issued zero fines to lorry drivers bypassing Brock – despite warnings they would be hit with £300 penalties.

A number of HGV drivers being sent back up the M2 from Brenley Corner are bypassing the long route up to Maidstone and are opting to travel down the twisting A251 from Faversham to Ashford, where they can join the M20 at Junction 9 or 10a.

Operation Brock at junction 9, coastbound Picture: Barry Goodwin
Operation Brock at junction 9, coastbound Picture: Barry Goodwin

On Wednesday night, National Highways moved the front of the queue to junction 11 to try and stop this.

Lorries have also been using the A28 and getting lost in country roads on the approach to Canterbury as they attempt to avoid the checks at Brenley Corner and get onto the coastbound A2 at Wincheap.

Meanwhile, over in Folkestone, the town’s roads have become a parking lot for lorries.

The Roundhill Tunnel is shut coastbound, while the A2 Jubilee Way is also closed coastbound from the A258 to A20.

The M20 is shut to non-freight traffic between Junction 8 for Maidstone and Ashford, therefore the A20 suffers as a result.

Slow moving traffic on the coastbound approach to Junction 8 of the M20 is nigh-on certain every day due to Brock, with hold-ups stretching as far back as Junction 4.



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