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Publication and Presentation Roundup: A Look at Scholarly Work from College of Education Researchers from January-March, 2022

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Faculty, staff and research associates at the NC State College of Education, including its Belk Center for Community College Leadership and Research and Friday Institute for Educational Innovation, are publishing their research related to pressing educational topics in journals and sharing their work through national and international presentations. 

Take a look at a selection of presentations and publications from our faculty and research associates from January through March 2022 below.  

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Editor’s note: The following list was compiled from information submitted by College of Education faculty and research associates. The list is divided into presentations and publications. Individual submissions are listed by date published or presented.

Publications

Queer futuring: an approach to critical futuring strategies for adult learners

This article, authored by Professor Jayne Fleener, aims to develop queer futuring strategies that take into consideration adult learners’ needs in support of transformational and sustainable change for social justice and equity. The article was published on Jan. 17, 2022 in On the Horizon.  

Making room for Zoom in focus group methods: Opportunities and challenges for novice researchers (during and beyond COVID-19)

This article, authored by Assistant Professor Michelle Falter and nearly a dozen College of Education doctoral students, presents doctoral students’ experiences with conducting focus groups using Zoom during a qualitative methods course on interviewing methods. Participants reflect on the opportunities and challenges experienced as moderators and participants using Zoom. The article was published on Jan. 29, 2022, in Forum: Qualitative Social Research.

Why is it so hard to reconcile disciplinary literacy and antiracism? Informational texts and middle grades English language arts

This paper, authored by Assistant Professor Chandra Alston and Friday Institute Research Associate Sarah Byrne Bausell, analyzes teacher talk in four virtual sessions with middle grades English language arts teachers in order to understand the supports and challenges for using disciplinary and anti-racism lenses when teaching with informational texts. Findings have implications for ELA teacher preparation as well as district and state resources to support the merging of disciplinarity and anti-racism in informational text instruction. The study was published on Feb. 1, 2022, in English Teaching: Practice & Critique

Can teacher-centered community-based conservation programs influence student household sustainable behaviors near a biodiversity hotspot?

This article, co-authored by Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor Sarah Carrier and doctoral student Aimee Fraulo, evaluated the effectiveness of the UNITE for the Environment’s teacher training on sustainability practices on the broader community. Results showed that UNITE households showed greater use of sustainable practices, greater value of the environment and belief in their ability to affect the environment. The paper was published on Feb. 11, 2022, in Conservation and Science Practice

Post-Truth as an Epistemic Crisis: The Need for Rationality, Autonomy, and Pluralism

This article, co-authored by Associate Professor Chad Hoggan, offers an update and defense of three core epistemic concepts: rationality, autonomy and pluralism. It argues that to address the epistemic crisis in contemporary society, adult education needs to develop epistemically responsible learners, promote diverse public learning spaces and teach learners how to engage in meaningful dialogue outside of echo chambers. The article was published on Feb. 15, 2022, in Adult Education Quarterly

Writing with dignity among youth in urban communities: Using mentor texts as a reflective tool for transformation

This article, authored by Assistant Professor Crystal Chen Lee and doctoral students Laura Jacobs and Jennifer Mann, describes a three-year, qualitative study on how youth of color in the Durham Community Youth organization used Dr. Martin Luther King’s  “What’s Your LIfe’s Blueprint?” text as a reflective tool to transform themselves and their community. The paper was published on Feb. 23, 2022 in Urban Education

Teachers’ perceptions of using technology to teach mathematics during COVID-19 remote learning

This article, authored by doctoral student Jerome Amedu and Associate Dean for Research and Innovation Karen Hollebrands, investigated two high school teachers’ perceptions of the issues surrounding teaching mathematics remotely during the pandemic and factors that contributed to their use of technology while teaching online. Results showed that both teachers found online mathematics teaching to be more difficult when compared to classroom-based instruction. The paper was published on Feb. 24, 2022, in REDIMAT.

Development and Validation of a Tool to Examine Program-Wide Implementation of the Pyramid Model

This paper, co-authored by Assistant Professor Lam Pham, describes an evaluation of the technical properties of the Supporting Program-wide Implementation Fidelity Instrument, a tool developed to be used to measure Program-Wide Support for Pyramid Model implementation in early childhood programs. The article was published on Feb. 25, 2022, in the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions.

A look into the AP Statistics classroom: Who teaches it and what aspects of statistics do they emphasize?

This study, from Distinguished Professor and Friday Institute Senior Faculty Fellow Hollylynne Lee, aims to understand more about the practices in Advanced Placement Statistics and offers insight into teachers of the course, what their classrooms look like and the aspects of statistics that are emphasized in their curriculum and instruction. The article was published on March 1, 2022, in CHANCE. 

Can Computing Be Diversified on “Principles” Alone? Exploring the Role of AP Computer Science Courses in Students’ Major and Career Intentions

This article, co-authored by Belk Center Senior Research Associate Kaitlin Newhouse, examines data from more than 120,000 college students in the United States in order to understand the relationship between taking the Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles course, the Advanced Placement Computer Science course, or both, in high school and students’ major and career aspirations in computing or technology. The study was published on March 4, 2022, in ACM Transactions on Computing Education.

Investigation of the relationships among science teachers’ epistemic orientations, epistemic understanding, and implementation of Next Generation Science Standards science practices

This study, authored by Professor Soonhye Park and doctoral students Vance Kite and Arif Rachmatullah, examined the relationship between secondary science teachers’ epistemic orientations and their understanding and self-reported implementation of the science practices described in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Results showed teachers’ participation in a NGSS professional development program significantly predicted their self-reported implementation of science practices and that lateral-entry into the profession was the only significant predictor of teachers’ epistemic understanding of science practices. The article was published on March 20, 2022, in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching.

Digging into data: Illustrating a data investigation process

This paper, authored by Distinguished Professor and Friday Institute Senior Faculty Fellow Hollylynne Lee, Friday Institute Research Scholar Gemma F. Mojica and Friday Institute Research Scholar Emily Thrasher, discusses the need for K-12 students to develop a practice of using data in investigations of real-world phenomena through processes that will prepare them to be data-literate citizens and open doors for data-intensive career pathways. The article was published on March 23, 2022, in Statistics Teacher. 

Epistemic orientation toward teaching for knowledge generation: conceptualization and validation of the construct

This study, co-authored by Professor Soonhye Park, aimed to propose epistemic orientation as a key component of teacher development for implementing knowledge generation approaches and develop an empirically grounded model of the construct through a mixed-methods approach. The paper was published on March 25, 2022, in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching.

School ethnic-racial socialization and adolescent ethnic-racial identity

This article, authored by Associate Professor Christy Byrd, examines the relationship between ethnic-racial socialization and adolescent ethnic-racial identity and investigates how the things adolescents learn about race, ethnicity and culture at school is associated  with their ethnic-racial identity. Findings underline the importance of the school context in shaping students’ ethnic-racial socialization and identity. The study was published in Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology.

Presentations

How the forced move online changed students’ political experiences and what we can learn from it

This presentation, which was co-delivered by Senior Director of Student Success Alex Kappus, connected three projects that explored how transitioning to online learning in 2020 influenced the political experiences of college students during the 2020 election. The presentation was delivered on Jan. 21, 2022,  during the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) Annual Conference.

Blockchain credentialing, pervasive learning & the future of higher education

This paper, presented by Professor Jayne Fleener, supports the vision that blockchain technologies may provide opportunities for individuals to demonstrate lifelong learning credentials and competencies, disrupting traditional credentialing approaches and infrastructure. The presentation was given on Feb. 5, 2022, during the Reimagining Education Conference. 

Humanizing stories: The potential of community-based partnerships for English Language Arts pre-service teacher education

This presented paper, delivered by Assistant Professor Crystal Chen Lee and doctoral students Caitlin Donovan and Jennifer Mann, explores the possibilities and potential of bridging English language arts teacher education and community partnerships to foster culturally responsive practices through the examination of the experiences of pre-service ELA teachers. The presentation was delivered on Feb. 5, 2022, at the annual meeting of the National Council of Teachers of English Assembly of Research.

Developing preservice teachers’ statistical knowledge for teaching association with CODAP

This presentation, delivered by Friday Institute Research Scholar Gemma F. Mojica and Friday Institute Research Scholar Emily Thrasher, focused on how to develop pre-service teachers’ statistical knowledge using the dynamic data tool known as CODAP. The presentation was delivered on Feb. 10, 2022, during the Annual Meeting of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators.

Using video to develop mathematics teachers’ knowledge

This presentation, delivered by Friday Institute Research Scholar Gemma F. Mojica and Friday Institute Research Scholar Emily Thrasher, considered how different types of videos can be utilized to develop teachers’ knowledge and shared approaches for supporting learning through the use of video as a reflective tool. The presentation was delivered on Feb. 10, 2022, during the Annual Meeting of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators.

Transformational Learning in Community Colleges

This presentation, delivered by Associate Professor Chad Hoggan, details the profound social and emotional challenges that nontraditional and historically underserved students undergo when they enter community college and outlines a new approach to providing a community college education that explicitly reduces or supports students in facing these challenges. The presentation was delivered on Feb. 25, 2022, at the Wake Technical Community College Adult Learner Outreach Task Force.

Post-Truth as an Epistemic Crisis

This keynote address, delivered by Associate Professor Chad Hoggan, provides an update and defense of three core epistemic concepts– rationality, autonomy, and pluralism– and argues that in order to address the epistemic crisis, adult education needs to develop epistemically responsible learners, promote diverse public learning spaces and teach learners how to engage in meaningful dialogue outside of echo chambers. The presentation was delivered on March 1, 2022, at the Daisaku Ikeda Joint University Research Institute for Education and Development (IEDDAI) in Spain.

Transformative Learning Theory

This presentation, delivered by Associate Professor Chad Hoggan, describes the historical evolution of transformative learning theory from its inception in 1978 to its modern use as a meta-theory. The presentation was delivered on March 1, 2022, at the University of Alcalá in Spain.

Suzhou North America High School: Connecting to the future project 2013-2022

This presentation, delivered by Friday Institute Research Associate Marie Himes, shares a timeline of the partnership between Suzhou North American High School in China and the New Literacies Collaborative at the Friday Institute and three guiding principles for sustaining a cross-organizational, international partnership. The presentation was delivered on March 9, 2022, during the ITEEA Twenty-First Century Leadership Academy.

Today’s Epistemic Crisis and a Post-Postmodernism

This webinar, co-delivered by  Associate Professor Chad Hoggan, provides an update and defense of three core epistemic concepts– rationality, autonomy, and pluralism– and argues that in order to address the epistemic crisis, adult education needs to develop epistemically responsible learners, promote diverse public learning spaces and teach learners how to engage in meaningful dialogue outside of echo chambers. The webinar took place on  March 16, 2022, through the International Transformative Learning Association.

Beyond Prescriptive Reforms: An Examination of North Carolina’s Flexible School Restart Program

This presented paper from Assistant Professor Lam Pham, graduate research assistant Gage Matthews and Associate Professor Tim Drake, examines the North Carolina’s Restart (NCR) school reform policy, which allows low-performing schools to develop their own plans for improvement with flexibility from district and state regulations. Findings show NCR schools improved student achievement in math, but not in reading. The presentation was delivered on March 19, 2022, during the annual conference of the Association for Education Finance and Policy.

The Effect of School Reform on Teacher Attrition in Low-Performing Schools: Evidence from Tennessee

This paper, co-presented by Assistant Professor Lam Pham, examined teachers in Tennessee’s chronically lowest-performing schools–known as priority schools– to better understand the relationship between working in schools targeted for reform and teacher turnover. Findings show priority school teachers are no more or less likely to transfer schools, and there is only weak evidence they are more likely to leave the profession. The paper was presented on March 19, 2022, during the annual conference of the Association for Education Finance and Policy.

The Alignment Agenda: Examining the Movement to Bridge the Early Childhood and K-12 Sectors

This presentation from Assistant Professor Michael Little provides an in-depth description of the movement to improve alignment between early childhood and K-12 education sectors, focusing on problems with the status quo, the nature of proposed alignment reforms and the challenges and facilitators of advancing alignment reforms. The presentation was given on March 19, 2022, during the annual conference of the Association for Education Finance and Policy.

PBI Global: Engaging readers who struggle

This presentation, delivered by Associate Dean and Friday Institute Executive Director Hiller Spires, Friday Institute Research Associates Sarah Byrne Bausell and Marie Himes and graduate research assistant Jessica Eagle, focuses on how strategic scaffolds can be used throughout inquiry learning, to support readers who struggle, using Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global – a five-phase collaborative inquiry-to-action process addressing the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The invited presentation was delivered on March 20, 2022, during a workshop from the NC Reading Association. 

Defending democracy during the 2020 election: Learning from the lived experience of peer educators involved in nonpartisan political engagement

This presentation from Senior Director of Student Success Alex Kappus reviewed findings of a qualitative study that examined the lived experiences of college students involved in nonpartisan political engagement during the 2020 election and the influence of these activities on students’ future aspirations for civic engagement. The presentation was delivered on March 22, 2022, at the annual National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) Conference.

Digital democracy: Lessons learned from student and faculty innovation in the 2020 election cycle

This presentation from Senior Director of Student Success Alex Kappus shared how transitioning to online learning in 2020 influenced the political experiences of students and faculty during the 2020 U.S. election cycle. Findings showed online learning posed a challenge to discussing political topics in classrooms for multiple reasons, but peer-to-peer social media engagement helped mitigate some of the information gap. The presentation was delivered on March 22, 2022, at the annual National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) Conference.

The Handbook of Research in Science Teacher Education: Current and future directions for research

This symposium, which was co-delivered by Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professors Gail Jones and Sarah Carrier and Professor Soonhye Park, served as a presentation of the new Handbook of Research in Science Teacher Education: Current and Future Directions of Research. The presentation was delivered on March 27, 2022, during the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) conference. 

STEM Transfer: Residence, Momentum, and Rural-Serving Colleges

This presentation, delivered by doctoral student and Belk Center research associate Holley Nichols and W. Dallas Herring Professor and Belk Center Executive Director Audrey Jaeger, explores the degree to which residing in a rural, economically depressed county is associated with STEM bachelor’s degree completion among community college transfer students as well as the moderating effects of attending a rural-serving community college before transfer to a four-year institution. The presentation was delivered on March 28, 2022, at the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) conference.

UNITE for the environment: Examining the impact of a sustainable livelihoods program on pro-environmental behaviors in Ugandan student households near a biodiversity hotspot

This presentation, co-delivered by Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor Sarah Carrier and doctoral student Aimee Fraulo, presents the measured influence of teachers’ communication with students and the impact they had on their students’ and households’ sustainable activities. The presentation was delivered on March 28, 2022, during the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) conference. 

Teacher educators and elementary teachers share goals for authentic science and literacy integration in the 20th century realities of 21st century classrooms

This presentation, delivered by Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor Sarah Carrier and doctoral student Danielle Scharen, shared the voices of elementary teachers, science teacher educators and researchers, and literacy teacher educators and researchers as they discussed the need for more authentic science instruction through the integration of science in a literacy-focused school day. The presentation was delivered on March 29, 2022, during the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) conference. 

An expanded understanding of the influence of antecedent socialization on the choice to become a science teacherThis presentation, delivered by doctoral student Emma Refven, Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professors Gail Jones and Sarah Carrier and several other doctoral students, examines the influences that inspired people to become science teachers. The presentation was delivered on March 30, 2022, during the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) conference.



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