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Start of work on nine flats for supported living in East Greenwich – South London News

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A ground-breaking ceremony marked the start of work on a specialist development of new homes for people with learning disabilities.

Supported living flats are to be built in Royal Hill, East Greenwich for nine residents across one four-bedroom shared home and five one-bedroom homes.

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Each ground floor home has access to a shared outdoor space, with a sensory garden, vegetable planters and an external dining area. A screened roof terrace will also be available for residents to use.

Cllr Danny Thorpe, leader of Greenwich council opened them on 15 March along with Cllr Miranda Williams, cabinet bember for health and Cllr Anthony Okereke, cabinet member for housing.

Cllr Danny Thorpe, Leader of the Council, said: “The provision of good quality housing is a key part of supporting people to live the life they want to lead – whatever their needs. As part of our Greenwich Builds programme the Council is building 750 new homes for residents across the borough, as well as working in partnership with housing associations, private developers and community benefit societies to deliver hundreds more homes for residents on our waiting lists.”

Supported living flats are to be built in Royal Hill, East Greenwich for nine residents

Cllr Miranda Williams, Cabinet Member for Health and Adults’ Social Care, said: “We know that the number of our residents with a learning disability who will need specialist housing like this is increasing. By building our own homes, in our own borough, we can help to ensure that people with learning disabilities can live in the areas that they know and feel safe in – like Royal Hill where future residents will be in the heart of the town centre. I cannot wait until it is finished.”

Cllr Anthony Okereke, Cabinet Member for Housing, said: “This Greenwich Builds development at Royal Hill has been specially designed to help give people with learning disabilities the opportunity to live more independently. As well as being high quality and zero carbon, it is also sympathetic to the historic character of the local area.”

The council carried out an extensive public consultation with the local community. This resulted in a final design that shows great consideration for the neighbouring properties and the surrounding heritage of the area, making a positive addition to the community.

In keeping with the council’s draft Carbon Neutral Plan, the Royal Hill home will meet zero carbon standards, by using sustainable technologies such as solar panels and air source heat pumps.

 



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